Kenji

General Counsel

General Information

Businesses have legal questions on a daily basis. General counsels, sometimes known as chief legal officers, advise you on and help solve the legal issues your business is facing. General counsels are highly skilled attorneys with a broad range of experience applicable to a business’s legal needs and often gained experience as associates or partners at large law.

For small businesses, hiring an in house general counsel is often prohibitively expensive. A Kenji outside general counsel can provide your business with ongoing legal advice and handle many of the day-to-day legal issues your business may face, without the expense of a full time general counsel. Additionally, while most businesses develop a relationship with one outside general counsel, with Kenji you still have access to our network of attorneys with specific areas of expertise.

A general counsel can help advise and handle a wide range of business legal needs including:

  • Business formation
  • Corporate governance and maintenance
  • Stock issuances
  • Employment issues
  • Contract drafting and review
  • Contract negotiations
  • Securities and fundraising

As an entrepreneur, you have a lot on your plate. With Kenji, you can now find an experienced general counsel to handle your business’s legal needs – saving you time and giving you peace of mind –while you focus on growing your business.

Other Business Types

Sole-Proprietorship

A sole-proprietorship is not a formal business structure that must be formed by filing incorporation papers with a state entity. A sole-proprietorship is a business that has not incorporated and has a single owner. Unlike an incorporated business such as an LLC, C-Corp, or S-Corp, a sole-proprietorship owner’s personal assets are not a separate legal entity. Thus, the owner is personally responsible for the actions, debts, and liabilities of the company. Since there is no other structure, the profits and losses from the business are only taxed on the individual’s personal return.

Partnership

A partnership is not formal business structure that must be formed by filing incorporation papers with a state entity. A partnership is like a sole-proprietorship, but with two or more owners. The owners are personally responsible for the actions, debts, and liabilities of the company. Since there is no other structure, the profits and losses from the business are taxed on the individual partners’ returns.

Costs

Cost vary depending on how often you consult your general counsel, attorney rates, attorney experience, and necessary turnaround time, among other considerations. Since each business is unique, with Kenji you can now easily request custom proposals from vetted attorneys and find the best one for your business – saving you time and money.